June 2021 Soap Challenge Club: Stained Glass Soap

Charles Rennie Mackintosh was a Scottish artist famous for his unique art deco architecture, stained glass, furniture, paintings, household items, and more. He designed the architecture of a Glasgow Art School building that was sadly destroyed in a fire. The rebuilding and restoration of the building is in progress. When I read that this month’s challenge would be to create stained glass window soap, the only choice for me was to make a Charles Rennie Mackintosh inspired soap.

This is an iconic Charles Rennie Mackintosh stained glass window
This is one of my favorite Charles Rennie Mackintosh windowpanes, which I’ve tried to duplicate in my CRM inspired soap.
Source: https://www.corianderstainedglass.co.uk/tag/charles-rennie-mackintosh/
Source: http://styleglass.com/charlesrenniemackintosh2.html
Source: https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/jun/07/charles-rennie-mackintosh-architect-of-choice-blade-runner-doctor-who-madonna-glasgow

If you’re interested in learning more about Charles Rennie Mackintosh please check out the Wikipedia article Here

Materials

  • Cold Process Soap base
  • Diamond Clear Melt & Pour Soap Base
  • Activated Charcoal for creating dark piping lines
  • Titanium Dioxide for whitening the cold process soap base
  • Colorants (I used liquid colorants)
  • Fragrance (I made a custom essential oil blend that I am calling “Wooded Rose”)
  • Transfer pipettes
  • Digital thermometer to measure the temperature of the m&p soap. If the soap boils or steams, it becomes cloudy and will ruin the design.

Method

Create a cold process soap base and piping. Add melt and pour soap to create a stained glass effect. Cover in a final layer of clear melt and pouren: Document steps with pictures to show freehand work.

Experiment

To start, I made a small batch of cold process soap to experiment with the technique. I made enough soap to make two small slabs and allow extra soap for piping. I recently heard a theory that batch painting makes your more efficient and improves your skills faster, so I applied the theory here as well.

Piping is a new technique for me. The piping tip I chose ended up being a bit too larger to give as fine of details as I wanted. My technique was also evolving as I proceeded. 😆
This slab mold makes 4 generous bars of soap. The design is intended for each bar to be its own stained glass art.
I was so happy with this slab. Unfortunately I overheated the clear coat of m&p soap, and it turned cloudy with time. The melt and pour was applied the second day after curing the slab in the oven (CPOP).

After finishing piping the first practice slab, I started in on a second “window pane”

I loved the pale colors in this slab but sadly they faded away a few days later. I’m guessing the amount of colorant was probably insufficient, as it was just a diluted red and not a dedicated pink colorant.

Next I made a small and medium slab with a finer piping tip. My goal was to make a 4 count slab and a slab with random CRM roses. I also went with a simpler color scheme to keep the design more simple and clean, and allow for the iconic negative space found in CRM designs.

Adding fine lines to the edges

Creating the window pane dividers in the small soap

I left the stained glass effects to set up overnight before adding the top clear coat. I used a few different shades of red to fill the petals. To lighten a petal to a pink color and avoid color fading, I used a bit of yellow colorant. It would be interesting to do this again with micas. If you look closely, you can see some petals look orange red, pink, true red, or a slightly blue red. 🙂
The Wooded Rose (CRM inspired)
O my Luve is like a red, red rose
The Wooded Rose (CRM inspired)
O my Luve is like a red, red rose (taken from the Robert Burns poem)

One thought on “June 2021 Soap Challenge Club: Stained Glass Soap

  1. Yay for so many photos!! So sorry you lost your post… The soaps look fantastic in every way! You did a really great job on your free hand design, and the colors really pop!

    Like

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